Tech Tip: Explanation of the Xeon Scalable Family Series

Intel Xeon SP (Scalable Processors) Naming Convention
Intel Xeon SP (Scalable Processors) Naming Convention

How to Read the New Naming Convention

Before the change in 2017, Intel processors had a different naming convention with their ‘E’ families (E3, E5, E7). However, now they have classified their processors by precious metals. Below is the steps you can follow to understand the new naming convention and find out the differences between them. And, below that are some specs you can find that belong to each group.

Step 1. Xeon + Metal

The new structure for Intel Xeon Processor Families is broken down into five classes of metal: Platinum, Gold, Gold, Silver, and Bronze. Note that gold is mentioned twice because there are actually two classes of Gold in the new structure.

Platinum series CPUs are very similar to the Xeon E7 tiers in terms of how many

Step 2. Xeon + Metal + Thousands

Each of the metal series belongs to a corresponding number by the thousands. Platinum series is in the 8000’s, the higher-end Gold series is in the 6000’s the lower-end Gold series is in the 5000’s, the Silver series is in the 4000’s, and the Bronze series is in the 3000’s.

Look out for the naming convention to start to look like so:

  • Platinum: 8000
  • Gold: 6000
  • Gold: 5000
  • Silver: 4000
  • Bronze: 3000

Step 3. Xeon + Metal + Thousands + Hundreds

The next number in the naming convention will let you know the microarchitecture the processor belongs to, commonly referred to the generation of the CPU. For example 100’s belongs to Skylake and 200’s belongs to Cascade Lake.

Notice that the naming convention will start to look like so:

  • Skylake Example: Platinum 8100
  • Cascade Lake example: Platinum 8200

Step 4. Find the Actual Processor SKU

The next two numbers in the naming convention will let you know what the actual SKU is of the processor. You’ll see numbers like 80, 76, 68, etc.

Notice the naming convention revealing the CPU SKU

  • Platinum 8180
  • Platinum 8176
  • Gold 6154
  • Gold 6140

Step 5. Denotation of the Processor’s Integrations and Optimizations

If the processor integrates with the Omni-Path Host Fabric, it will be denoted with an ‘F’ following the four digit number. If the processor has a high temperature case (Tcase), then it will have a ‘T’ following the four digit number.

  • Fabric Example: Platinum 8176F Processor
  • Tcase Example: Gold 5119T Processor

Note that these characters are not always found. Your processor may not have an ‘F’ or ‘T’ on it.

Step 6. Denotation of the Processor’s Memory Capacity

The final denotation found on the processor’s name will indicate it’s memory capacity. You will either find an ‘M’ or nothing at the end. If there is an ‘M’ following the four digit number, then the memory capacity is 1.5TB per socket. If there is no ‘M’, then the memory capacity is 768GB per socket.

  • ‘M’ Example: Platinum 8180M Processor
  • Base Case: Platinum 8180 Processor

Intel Xeon Scalable Family General Specs

Xeon Platinum Series

new RAS features. Support for up to 8 sockets. Similar to the tier that would exist in Xeon E7 processors.

  • Thermal Design Power (TDP): 105W to 205W
  • Sockets Supported: 8
  • UPI Links: 3
  • Memory Speed Support: DDR4-2466
  • FMA Units: Yes
  • Maximum Cores: 28
  • Maximum Threads: 56

Xeon Gold (6100 Series)

  • Thermal Design Power (TDP): Gold CPUs have Thermal Design Power ranges between 85W to 200W.
  • Sockets Supported: 4
  • UPI Links: 3
  • Memory Speed Support: DDR4-2466
  • FMA Units: Yes
  • Maximum Cores: 22
  • Maximum Threads: 44

Xeon Gold (5100 Series )

  • Thermal Design Power (TDP): Gold CPUs have Thermal Design Power ranges between 85W to 200W.
  • Sockets Supported: 4
  • UPI Links: 2
  • Memory Speed Support: DDR4-2400
  • FMA Units: Yes
  • Maximum Cores: 14
  • Maximum Threads: 28
  • High Performance Computer (HPC): Not likely

Xeon Silver

  • Thermal Design Power (TDP): Gold CPUs have Thermal Design Power ranges between 85W to 200W.
  • Sockets Supported: 2
  • UPI Links: 2
  • Memory Speed Support: DDR4-2400
  • FMA Units: 1
  • Maximum Cores: 12
  • Maximum Threads: 24
  • High Performance Computer (HPC): No, targeted for lower power workloads.

Xeon Bronze

Successor to the lower end Intel Xeon E5 processors.

  • Thermal Design Power (TDP): 85W
  • Sockets Supported: 2
  • UPI Links: 2
  • Memory Speed Support: DDR4-2133
  • FMA Units: 1
  • Maximum Cores: 8
  • Maximum Threads: 16
  • High Performance Computer (HPC): Nope

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